Hop Chatter

The best blog ever - 'cause it's just about the beer.
The History of Porters and Stouts

The History of Porters and Stouts

By: MacKenzie Liptak | October 17, 2017 | in: Craft Beer

The approaching cold weather has inspired me to write about two of my favorite beer styles: porters and stouts. Often synonymous with winter, porters and stouts have complex and rich flavor profiles often tasting of coffee, dark or milk chocolate, and roasted maltiness. They are dark, sometimes black in color, often with a creamy mouthfeel. My mouth is watering at the thought. Without further ado, let’s dive into the history of porters and stouts.

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New Yorks Take on the Traditional Märzen

New York's Take on the Traditional Märzen

By: Ben Richards | October 3, 2017 | in: Craft Beer

With the changing of the seasons comes the quick and feverous shifting of the craft beer drinker's palate. Rolling into the fall weather, beer enthusiasts start to seek out the heavier, maltier, and all around full-bodied offerings, not only from their local breweries, but from the nation-wide producers as well. Today, I want to talk a little bit about the fall seasonal offerings from our New York State breweries, specifically their take on a traditional Oktoberfest style, the Märzen.

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A Brief History of Märzen and Oktoberfest

A Brief History of Märzen and Oktoberfest

By: Brian Coffey | August 24, 2017 | in: Craft Beer

As the air becomes crisper and the leaves begin to change, beer enthusiasts turn their attention from summer quenchers to darker and maltier beers. The beer that best represents the autumn season in both taste and appearance is the copper colored, malty lager known as the Märzen.

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Guinness The Perfect Introduction to Dark Beer

Guinness: The Perfect Introduction to Dark Beer

By: Zebadiah Pagerie | July 18, 2017 | in: Craft Beer

Previously in "Ode to An Old Friend" I talked about my first true love, Ithaca Flower Power. That post was wax poetic, exemplifying how much I loved that beer and how it molded me into the craft beer drinker I am today. Initially, I almost exclusively drank IPAs and wouldn't touch a dark beer. They were too mysterious.

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Wheat the Other Brewing Grain

Wheat, the Other Brewing Grain

By: MacKenzie Liptak | June 27, 2017 | in: Craft Beer

Brewers have been brewing with wheat for as long as they have brewed with barley. Like barley, wheat has high diastatic power, which refers to the malt’s ability to break down starches into fermentable sugars. This attribute is important because it gives wheat an advantage over other grains with low diastatic power. Wheat is also high in protein and starch. These qualities provide a creamy texture, hazy appearance, and great head retention to a finished beer.

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Shandy The Official Beer of Summer

Shandy: The Official Beer of Summer

By: JP DeCarlo | May 30, 2017 | in: Craft Beer

The other day, while sitting at home, I heard a knock at my back door. Upon opening it, standing before me were the signs of summer. It's been a while since we've experienced a summer day, but when summer comes to visit, it brings some of the most refreshing, fruity, citrusy beverages we can imagine. One of these is called a shandy.

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What Are Hops?

What Are Hops?

By: Dave Wilfore | March 15, 2017 | in: Craft Beer

Today’s craft beer scene is all about big, hoppy beers. While it may seem like hops are the main ingredient in craft beer, they are actually one of four essential ingredients, along with barley, yeast and water. However, in many American style beers, they tend to steal the spotlight.

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Stouts to Enjoy on St. Patricks Day

Stouts to Enjoy on St. Patrick's Day

By: Chris Farnam | March 8, 2017 | in: Craft Beer

With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, March is the perfect month to enjoy a warming stout beer. Most often made with roasted barley and malts, the word stout has evolved from being used to describe a strong beer to a synonym of dark beer. The deceiving dark coloring of stouts leaves many with the false impression that stouts are filling and high in alcohol content. Quite the opposite, however, many (but not all) stout beers are lower in alcohol by volume, lower in caloric value, and rarely leave the stout drinker feeling overly full.

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